Featured Faculty Friday – Greg LeGault

Greg LeGaultFebruary 8, 2013

Mr. Greg LeGault

Associate Professor of Theatre

Getting to know you…

What is your family like?

Nuts. We’re older now, so the eccentricities and craziness have mellowed a bit, which is good, I guess. We all have a pretty good sense of humor and share a love of books and the arts.

What your favorite hobbies?

Woodworking, photography, and running

Do you still have your tonsils?

Nope. I think I said bon voyage to them back in … 1964–maybe ’65.

Would you bungee jump?

It depends on who’s attaching the gear and whether or not the million dollars has been deposited in my credit union account.

What is one thing you wish everybody knew about you?

I’m a mass of insecurities–No, wait! I mean, I’m supremely confident–Oh, rats! The jig is up now.

Getting to know your program…

What is your academic area?

Theatre, and a little communication arts as well.

What is the most rewarding part of your job?

Working wit students, naturally–I mean, that’s why I became a teacher. But I think the most rewarding part is watching  student step out of his or her comfort zone and do something they never thought they could do–never dreamed they’d do: make and score a short film, write a play, perform on stage–to surprise themselves! It’s incredibly rewarding to make that learning connection, where they not only learn from me, but I from them, too.

What is the worst part of your job?

Giving a student a poor grade. It means that, somewhere along the line, a connection wasn’t made.

If you could describe your teaching style in one word, what would it be?

Passionate.

What makes your academic area important?

Theatre is the mirror that we hold up to ourselves as human beings, and in whose reflection see ourselves at our best and worst, our most serious and tragic and our lightest and most comic. It helps us see who we were, who we are, and who we might be in the future. And because theatre is live, audience and performer share the experience live, in the moment! There is an intimacy to theatre that film and television can never capture. A theatre performance is fleeting, ephemeral; you can never revisit it, except in memory–and oh, how those memories can stay with us for a lifetime! Theatre is communication.